Balance and diversity of thought

People often say, opposites attract.  For my husband and I, that couldn’t be more true.

I am a risk comfortable, high energy, extrovert.  I think fast first, trusting my gut with an overlay of slow thinking to test to the minimum level required.  I love the company of people I know, but hate small talk with strangers.  I create tension by challenging the status quo.  I see a box as an opportunity to push the boundaries.  I am happy in the big and unknown.

Hubby is risk averse, contained and introverted.  He thinks slow first, with an enormous attention to detail that drives me crazy.  He loves the company of anyone, and can talk the ear off a donkey, but when he is with those he knows he feels safe enough to withdraw and take some time out for himself.  He smooths the way and tries to accommodate others.  He sees a box as a boundary within which to operate.  He is happy in the detailed and certain.

Neither of these are better or worse.  They just are.  We are both strong in our own right, but it is by combining these differing strengths that we create a whole that is better than the parts.

Where I want to leap into a decision, he makes me consider the risks.  Where he moves into paralysis by analysis, I push us forward.  He covers me when we are with strangers, and I cover him when we are with family.  Where I challenge our children, he supports them.

A strong management team is the same.  It is through diversity of thought, different approaches, a balance of strengths and an ability to push each other forward through the tough decisions that success occurs.  As long as you build a culture of trust where the team are able to have a constructive disagreement but maintain the relationship, differences will only make you stronger.

Stretch goals and motivation; watching from the side

My husband is going to run a marathon this year.  To take that statement at face value, you would assume that he is a runner, that he is the fit and healthy type and that he has probably done a half marathon before.

None of these assumptions would be accurate.  To be fair, when we met ten years ago he would go for the occasional run.  He even entered a few fun run type events, although the furthest distance he’d ever achieved was circa 10-12km.  Fast forward to present day and he is essentially going from zero to hero.  From couch to marathon.  From directionless and unmotivated, to single minded and driven.  Whilst this may be a sign of a midlife crisis, it is most definitely an achievement worth celebrating.

Upon winning an entry to the ASB Auckland Marathon event, he umm-ed and ahh-ed about the distance to enter.  A half would have been impressive, ‘Go for the full,’ I flippantly said.  Go for the full he has, and not just in distance, but in fundraising too.

By setting a big hairy audacious goal, a significant stretch for distance and funds raised, he has had to be significantly more disciplined in his approach.  With 42.2km to run and $4,220 to raise, he has had to understand the gap that existed between current and ideal states, then create a clear path to get there.  He has had to develop a comprehensive plan that has had to flex and bend obstacles arose.  He has had to create tactics that align with both his fundraising and training strategy for maximum efficiencies.  He has built awareness, created interest and converted his followers to capture donations.  I have never seen him more focused and so clear about the steps that he needs to take to achieve a goal.

His last training run was 28km, his donations are surging ahead at $3.5k.  Come the end of October he will have not only run a marathon and made a huge difference to Starship Children’s Hospital, but he will have knocked his BHAG out of the park.  Something that at first glance he thought was unachievable.

This to me is a story of the power of a goal.  Not just any goal, but a stretch goal, a BHAG.

The discipline and focus required to achieve something that borders the unachievable is one of the most powerful tools in the strategist’s toolkit.  What can seem scary at first forces you to think in a way that you would not have otherwise.  In business, or in life, what is driving you?  What is your stretch goal?  What sits at the outer edge of what you think is achievable?

To see more about Howard’s journey and donate: https://aucklandmarathon2016.everydayhero.com/nz/howard

Purposeful Choices – The value of a clear vision in a personal context.

Strategy 101 tells you that choices must be made in the context of a strategic intent.  A knowledge of the desired future state as expressed by some combination of vision, mission, values, goals (order and importance vary based on whatever source / author you’re referring to at the time).  As a strategy professional, my musing for today was reflecting upon the strategic intent behind the career choices that I’ve made to date.

As a five year old I would have expressed my future goals as “being a ‘boss’ and going to the Olympics.”  As a ten year old I wanted to “be the head coach of the All Blacks”.  By 11 I’d realised that the chance of that happening for a non-rugby playing female was relatively slim and so it became a desire to be “the All Blacks’ head doctor.”  15-year-old-me would have said I was going to be a leading Orthopaedic Surgeon and a few years later I’d completely pivoted to wanting to be a School Principal at a prominent school.

Now it’s completely normal for your ideas about your future to change as you age, but what I’ve realised is that there is very strong thread of commonality running through my intentions and dreams.  Although the specific goals have changed and flexed to suit the circumstances and context of the time, my vision has been pretty consistent.  In every field I chose to fixate on for that moment, I wanted to be the leader, to perform in the highest arena, to have influence and power so as to effect change, to use that change to enable success and to feel personal success through high performance.

Fast forward a good decade or so and here I am sitting in my car on the way home with hubby and he’s describing my career trajectory in terms that would be closer to luck than planning.  I was immediately uncomfortable with this suggestion.  Yes, from the outside it appears as if I’ve randomly hopped around through roles across multiple industries moving diagonally as well us vertically, and yes some of the opportunities I’ve been exposed to have come without me seeking them, but every choice I’ve made has been in keeping with the original vision.  For the record, these days I would express that vision as “leading and enabling shared success through high performance”, and yes, there is a current version of a specific and measurable goal that sits alongside that.

I wouldn’t go as far as saying that I don’t believe in luck, but luck is definitely influenced by considered planning led by good decision making and then proving your capability at every step of the way.  Confidence speaks volumes, but confidence backed by capability and good decisions wins.

Having worked in a variety of strategic roles and being immersed in strategic business conversations at the dinner table since childhood, I’ve been constantly exposed to the principles of good decision making.  Strategy is at its core, the art of making winning decisions.  The principles of good decision making apply not only to business, but to life, and upon reflection, it’s these that have guided my career thus far.

  1. Know what it is that you want to achieve but be open to alternate interpretations along the way.
  2. Share the vision widely, especially with trusted people who have power or influence, but most importantly share it with your support network and your team.
  3. Fully commit to the current course and know what defines success within the current interpretation. Know the goal and then systematically work towards those success metrics (yes numbers) until something indicates the need for change.
  4. Stay alert and open to opportunities and information that may change the status quo.
  5. Consider opportunities in the context of the overall vision and gather information to inform that view. Don’t make decisions in a vacuum.
  6. Share the thinking, create buy in and take people with you on the journey, especially when making significant changes.
  7. Fully commit to any new course of action ensuring you’ve got the capability required and execute with confidence.
  8. Celebrate milestones and success along the way. Look back to see how far you’ve come, and look forward to remind yourself of the end game, the vision and the current goal.

So back to the conversation of last night and I can’t help but wonder what my husband’s career vision is.  I don’t even know his longer term goal.  My clarity of vision (and personality) are such that I shout my opinions from the rooftops.  He is a more conservative soul motivated primarily by a thirst for knowledge and a feeling of making a difference for the local community rather than corporate ladder climbing.  There is however, no reason why he can’t gain clarity on his own vision and goals and pursue them in the same manner of purposeful choice that I have always instinctively followed.  A conversation for tonight perhaps!